INTRODUCTION

In color theory, color harmony refers to property that is some aesthetically pleasing color combination. These combinations create pleasing contrasts and consonants that are called harmonic. These combinations can be complementary colors, split-complementary colors, color tests, or analogous colors. Color cohesion has been the subject of extensive study throughout history, but has only seen widespread codification since the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution. Artists and designers use these harmonies to achieve certain moods or aesthetics.

There are 12 types of Color Harmonies

  1. KEY COLOR (Single color)
  2. ANALOGOUS (Combination of three to four adjacent colors )
  3. COMPLEMENTARY (Combination of two totally opposite colors)
  4. TRIADIC (a combination of every fourth color)
  5. TETRADIC (a combination of every third color)
  6. SPLIT COMPLEMENTARY (Set of color parts of opposite colors)
  7. DOUBLE COMPLEMENTARY (Two combinations of complementary colors not at a right angle)
  8. ACHROMATIC (Grey-Scale colors)
  9. MONOCHROMATIC (different values of a single color)
  10. BLACK AND WHITE (Totally linework different from Grey-scale)
  11. ACCENT (A color totally offbeat from other colors in design)
  12. SPLIT ANALOGOUS (The alternate three colors on the wheel)

1. KEY COLOR

The key color is the most important color of your design. It is the color you can’t change. For example Vodafone key color is red or Kinley water bottle key color is blue and many fast-food restaurants key color is red for example KFC, McDonald, Pizza hut, etc…

2. ANALOGOUS

In the first place, analogous color schemes use colors that are next to each other on the color wheel. They are usually well-matched and create a cool and comfortable design. Secondly, analogous color schemes are often found in nature and are harmonious and pleasing to the eye.

So always make sure you have enough contrast when choosing an analogous color scheme. Choose one color to dominate, another to support. The third color (with black, white or brown) is used as an accent.

ANALOGOUS COLOR WHEEL

 ANALOGOUS COLOR SCHEME DESIGN

 

 3. COMPLEMENTARY

Colors opposite each other on the color wheel are considered complementary colors (eg: red and green). The high contrast of complementary colors creates a vibrant look, especially when used in full saturation. This color scheme should be well managed so that it does not fall into the mess.

Complementary colors are difficult to use in large doses, but work well when you want to do something.Complementary colors are actually bad for text.

COMPLEMENTARY COLOR WHEEL

COMPLEMENTARY COLOR SCHEME LOGO

4. TRIADIC

A Triadic color scheme uses colors that extend evenly around the color wheel. Triadic colored harmoniums are quite vibrant, even if you use yellow or unsaturated versions of your color. To successfully use a triadic harmony, the colors must be carefully balanced – let one color dominate and use the other two for pronunciation.

TRIADIC COLOR WHEEL

TRIADIC COLOR SCHEME LOGO

5. TETRADIC

The rectangle or tetradic color scheme uses four colors arranged in two complementary pairs. This rich color scheme offers a lot of potential for differentiation. The tetradic color scheme works best if you let one color dominate. Mostly one should pay attention to the balance between warm and cool colors in your design.

TETRADIC COLOR WHEEL

TETRADIC COLOR SCHEME DESIGN

6. SPLIT COMPLEMENTARY

Rather than the point opposite the key color on the wheel, the split complementary takes the two colors directly on either side of the complementary color. This allows for a nicer range of colors while still not deviating from the basic harmony between the key color and the complementary color.

This color scheme has the same strong visual contrast as the complementary color scheme but has less tension. The split-complementary color scheme is a safe choice for virtually any design as it is near impossible to mess up and always looks good.

SPLIT COMPLEMENTARY COLOR SCHEME DESIGN

7. DOUBLE COMPLEMENTARY

A double complementary scheme occurs when two hues (colors) are next to each other on the color wheel and are paired with two adjacent hues on the opposite side. This creates a color palette of four colors in total that are adjacent but opposite such as blue-green, blue, orange, and red-orange.

DOUBLE COMPLEMENTARY COLOR WHEEL

DOUBLE COMPLEMENTARY SCHEME DESIGN

8. ACHROMATIC

A color scheme is a colorless scheme with no color, using only black, white and brown. Most probably achromatic color scheme uses values of black. One variation of this is possible by adding a hint of red yellow or blue to the neutral to create a warm or cold achromatic.

ACHROMATIC COLOR WHEEL

ACHROMATIC COLOUR SCHEME DESIGN

9. MONOCHROMATIC

It is a design using tints and shades on only one color or single color. the color displays low contrast as every value belongs to one color. logos made out of such harmony have very little option of the background than white to saving from vanishing their identity.

MONOCHROMATIC COLOR WHEEL

MONOCHROMATIC COLOR SCHEME LOGO

10. BLACK AND WHITE

Black & White are not colors they are extreme values of brightness. This color harmony design can be used for the social message or strong message. means graphics illustration on a social cause like the attack on women, or female foeticide, or child labor.

BLACK AND WHITE COLOUR WHEEL

BLACK AND WHITE COLOUR LOGO

11. ACCENT

The accent is not harmony but a color that is totally out of the family of color used for the design. Mostly, the color from the harmony of the opposites used; such as a complete design using cool color and something highlighted using warm color like “free” word in design or “50% discount “, the label of price slash, or tag highlight.  You can see the whole design in cool color but small word use in a warm color that is “NEW”.

ACCENT COLOR WHEEL

ACCENT COLOUR DESIGN OR LOGO

12. SPLIT ANALOGOUS

A split analog color scheme is one in which you leave a color between the three corresponding colors of the color wheel. Examples of a split analog color scheme would be red, orange, and yellow, leaving tertiary colors between them. Another example would be green, blue, and purple.

SPLIT ANALOGOUS COLOR WHEEL

CONCLUSION

Understanding the guidelines of colors is known as Harmony. We saw that there are different harmonies that can be selected by the designer as per the requirement of the design. Each harmony plays a crucial role in creating an aesthetic and pleasing design.


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